Photo 11 Aug 6,973 notes uglyboyzclub:

FUCK

uglyboyzclub:

FUCK

(Source: polosweater)

Photo 11 Aug 196 notes brazilwonders:

São Paulo (by Eduardo Kobra)

brazilwonders:

São Paulo (by Eduardo Kobra)

Video 11 Aug 51,950 notes
Text 11 Aug 44,471 notes

artslay:

Gaga: *sings about burqa in Aura*

white people: that is racist and offensive she needs to stop appropriating muslim culture

actual muslims:

image

"white people" ? Only "white people" ? Lol

Video 11 Aug 101,151 notes

(Source: best-of-memes)

Photo 10 Aug 64,395 notes medievalpoc:

gryblogs:

quietlyloud-intersex:

treeofcolor:

eurotrottest:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.
Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

interesting perspective

whats her name though

^^^

HER NAME IS SHARBAT GULA

When I speak about forms of colonialist violence and how it shapes the way we communicate, I hope that seeing this photograph with the above commentary included helps people understand what I mean.
This is how a person becomes reduced to an idea, an image, an accomplishment for someone else. She becomes “Afghan Girl”: a two-dimensional example meant to represent something over which she has no control. Was she ever paid for this photograph, or the second one above? 

No.
Why does Steve McCurry speak for her? Why does he control the conversation, why does he control what we can know about her? Where is her voice?
Who is Sharbat Gula?

medievalpoc:

gryblogs:

quietlyloud-intersex:

treeofcolor:

eurotrottest:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.

Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

interesting perspective

whats her name though

^^^

HER NAME IS SHARBAT GULA

When I speak about forms of colonialist violence and how it shapes the way we communicate, I hope that seeing this photograph with the above commentary included helps people understand what I mean.

This is how a person becomes reduced to an idea, an image, an accomplishment for someone else. She becomes “Afghan Girl”: a two-dimensional example meant to represent something over which she has no control. Was she ever paid for this photograph, or the second one above?

image

No.

Why does Steve McCurry speak for her? Why does he control the conversation, why does he control what we can know about her? Where is her voice?

Who is Sharbat Gula?

(Source: madfuture)

Text 10 Aug 881 notes

concerto4art-and-education said: Hi. Quick question about those manuscripts in Mali. What language are they written in? And what exactly is in it? Because from the info provided, it sounds a lot like texts we already knew exisisted. They're from the Islamic Empire right? I'm guessing they're written in some form of arabic, or persian? Idk exactly when some of these date from but they all seem to be from Islamic influence in the area.

christel-thoughts:

medievalpoc:

So do they contain wirtten records of these african tribes? Are they written in an African tribal language? Cause those weren’t facts included in the write ups and those facts would make them extremely significant. If they’re islamic texts like ones from Istanbul and Babylon, then all they show are the extent of the Islamic empire’s reach. The university of timbuktu isn;t the achievement of Africans, it’s the achievement of the Islamic Empire. Am I confused?

Alright, we’ll answer these questions for the last one to the first one, with some facts you apparently are in dire need of.

1. Only you can decide if you’re confused or not but if you need someone to tell you if you are or not, yes.

2. Which “Islamic Empire”? If you mean “any area ever ruled by an officially Muslim Government” then we’re talking:

image

3.  You seem extremely invested in taking achievements away from people you are calling “Africans”, who you seem to be under the impression are separate from “Islamic Empire”, are composed of “tribes” (WTF???), and speak “an African tribal language” (???).

So, all of that^ is really weird and racist and simplistic and just…wrong.

I get that you were probably weaned on The Single Story as so beautifully elucidated here by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, but you’re obviously very intent on imagining that somehow any achievements originating in an entire continent of humans, the LARGEST continent, in fact, can and should be attributed to someone else.

If you have a mental sliding scale that associates cultural achievements in direct correlation with the skin color you image the creators of these documents to have had, that is a problem that YOU have, and does not in any way reflect reality. And that is honestly the only way I can imagine anyone could have brought themselves to say any of what you have just said.

Saying that African medieval manuscripts “all seem to be from Islamic influence in the area” is directly equivalent to saying that European medieval manuscripts are “due to Christian influence in the area”. It’s neither right or wrong, it’s just a random statement with no point.

4. “Do they contain written records of African tribes?” Considering they are still in the process of being cataloged and digitized, there is very little they probably don’t contain, considering the sheer volume of manuscripts found. Also, see above.

5. You seem very concerned about what languages and scripts there are written in. Firstly, I’m going to point out that the majority of Medieval European manuscripts are written in Latin, not English, French, German, Spanish, Swedish, and so on.

Secondly, here is a portion of the indexing at Tombouctumanuscripts.org:

image

You can read an enhanced version of one of the manuscripts here in an interactive digital format:

image

This volume delineates the obligations of various parties to commercial exchanges and contracts. The author focuses on sales and protection for individuals loaning money in such transactions. Poetic verse is used to aid in memorizing the text.

Annotations placed between the lines of poetry clearly indicate that this document was used as a “textbook” to train students. The teacher first read the text to the student. The student, who sat facing the teacher, then annotated the text, thus the annotations are upside down when compared to the primary text of the document.

Rotating the text on the screen allows the viewer to see the document from the position of either the teacher or the student.

Honestly it’s a a little ironic to say “they sound like manuscripts we already know about”…who is “we”? Because you apparently know very little about them.

If anyone’s curious to read more about this library and the amazing librarians who guard them, you can read a news article here about the incredible bravery and courageous defense of these incredible manuscripts by their hereditary guardians:

When Abdel Kader Haidara was 17 years old, he took a vow. Among the families of Timbuktu with manuscript collections (and the Haidaras had one of the largest), it’s traditional for one family member from each generation to swear publicly that he will protect the library for as long as he lives. The families revere their manuscripts, even honoring them once a year through a holiday called Maouloud, on which imams and family elders perform a reading from the ancient prayer books to mark the birth of the Prophet Mohammed. “Those manuscripts were my father’s life,” Haidara told me. “They became my life as well.”

[…]

“If you [lose] a manuscript, it’s gone forever,” he told me. “Each one is unique, with its own story. It can’t be replaced.”

Toward the end of our time together, Haidara asked if I’d ever seen any of the documents. I said no, just scraps, and he looked surprised and took out his cell phone. With the expression of a proud parent scrolling through baby photos, he showed me images from his former collections, now all boxed up and hidden. But his smile did not fade as he kept scrolling through photo after photo after photo.

Read More

Now if THAT doesn’t steal the breath of any bibliophile who reads it, I don’t know what on earth could.

concerto4art-and-education’s questions make me think s/he doesn’t truly understand how empires work.

Text 10 Aug 2 notes

How do you know if something/someone is serious without asking though

Text 10 Aug 2 notes

African Americans have inspired so many people around the world, in SO many ways.

Photo 10 Aug 504 notes

(Source: brundletobrundle)

Text 10 Aug 1 note

I hate everything about Giroud but damn, that goal

Text 10 Aug

I still need to:

  • Get electricity for the apartment in the south
  • Get the internet in that same appartment
  • Buy a sofa for that same appartment
  • Buy loudspeakers…
Photo 10 Aug 57 notes gbleakney:

Empty roads.  San Andres Archipelago.

gbleakney:

Empty roads.  San Andres Archipelago.

Photo 10 Aug 120 notes

(Source: wordsingerman)

Text 10 Aug 1 note

Pretty excited to start classes in September.

This year looks promising in a way, and pivotal. Yes, pivotal is the word.


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